Mera peak climbing FAQ

01: HOW DIFFICULT AND TECHNICAL IS MERA PEAK CLIMB?

The excellent news is Mera Peak, one of the least technical peaks to climb, although one of the highest trekking peaks of Nepal, where grading system is just ‘F,’ means “Facial Easy” used from French and Swiss Alpine Climbing Classification.
A peak of less technical difficulty but leads to the strenuous long climb to reach the summit and taking care of descending where walk and climb lead to moraine-ice-snow and glaciers.
But all climbers need to be physically fit and in sound medical health as well as having proper climbing equipment also.

02: HOW MANY NIGHTS IN TENTS DURING MERA PEAK CLIMB?

Mera Peak, located far and away from villages and towns with no Tea-House /Lodge on the route, is not available. On treks and climbs spending in tents with all camping gear and facilities with
individual kitchen unit with cook, kitchen staff, trek /climbing guides, and secure porters.
With camping includes dining tents as group size with toilet tent on dug-out hole on this trek and climb spending nights in tents from Lukla till back at Lukla duration of 12 nights and 13 days as our standard itinerary.

03: DO I NEED CLIMBING EXPERIENCE FOR MERA PEAK CLIMB?

If you have done a basic course which will add more to your skill but exactly not overall necessary, where one has to be good and physically fit with sound medical, where the rest of the climbing skills our expert guide will instruct and teaches you before the actual climb with the technique needed.
All you need a positive attitude and determination rest our guide will support you throughout the climb and brings back safely after enjoying a lifetime experience.

04: WHAT TYPES OF EQUIPMENT/GEARS DO I NEED FOR MERA PEAK CLIMB?

Must be well equipped to enjoy the climb with good and standard climbing gear or equipment that includes plastic boots for the climb and good quality ice-ax, most equipment listed on our home page, or websites as well for trekking portions. If you need more information on climb and gear where you can contact us, if it’s too much to carry from home, some of the items can be bought or on hire in Kathmandu.

05: CAN I TREK AND CLIMB SOLO ON MERA PEAK CLIMB WITHOUT GUIDE/PORTERS?

On trekking Peaks where individual people are not allowed as per the rules of the country for one safety, trekking peaks or mountain expeditions where one can do it but needs to register and join with Government reputed and Registrated Company so that you will have a safe adventure in the company of local guides.

06: IF I GET ALTITUDE SICKNESS PROBLEM?

It is normal in Himalaya, where some people might catch a slight touch of AMS (Acute Mountain Sickness) at above 3,000 m or 4,000 m high. One can start taking Diamox or Acetazolamide as per your doctor’s advice with recommending dose, has been used for assisting with acclimatization on high altitude.
Where medical reports indicate, the drug might be useful in treating at the early stages of altitude sickness for prevention measures. But the best remedy is to head down till one is safe and secure at a certain altitude, on recovering depends on fitness level carry on or quite the onward journey to reach back at Kathmandu.
For severe illness and immediate evacuation is by helicopter as extended client insurance covers helicopter rescue and medical expenses during treatment.

07: WHO/ HOW WILL I GET HELP IF I HAVE ANY PROBLEM ON MERA PEAK CLIMB?

All guides of White Hill Adventure are professional and have gone through basic medical training as well for high altitude sickness, where our guides help you to in case of medical and personal problems.
We also carry portable oxygen and Gamma Bags (Pressure bags) for emergency purposes.

08: HOW EXPERIENCE MY SHERPA GUIDE AND PORTERS FOR MERA PEAK CLIMB?

White Hill Adventure provides expert and professional guides and well-experienced staff, which the areas of the country very well either on treks or climb to Mera Peak, who has risen and experienced many leading treks for past decades.

09: HOW MUCH COST FOR PERMITS?

Besides major mountaineering expeditions where most of the trekking peaks controlled by NMA (Nepal Mountaineering Association) where climbing fees for the mountains such as Mera Peak will be @ the US $ 700 in the group of 5-7 persons if group numbers gain extra cost came to US$ 20 per day and added on each day of during climb period.
Extra fee includes Sagarmatha and Makalu Barun National Park Fees as well.

10: WHAT IS THE COST FOR MERA PEAK CLIMB?

It all depends upon itinerary day duration for the climb and as per group size with
fees that include peaks as well for the park entrance @ cost ………………
US$ ……………….. per person in the group of minimum 2/3 pax
US$ ……………….. per person in the group of minimum 4 /6 pax
US$ ……………….. per person in the group of maximum above 10 /12 pax

11: FOOD AND TEA HOUSE CONDITION:

Mera Peak Climb it will be on all on camping basis, from the start to an end of the trek and climb, the only Lodge to stay will be at Lukla for an overnight stop before flying to Kathmandu.
Food served in camping of standard quality with set meals, includes breakfast- lunch and dinner with refreshing afternoon tea/coffee will be served cooked by our expert cooks.
Most of the meals include typical Nepalese Dal / Bhat with lentil soup and seasonal vegetables, Sherpa / Chinese / Indian dishes to Continental meals where our cook can offer delights like fresh bakeries cakes, pie, and slices of bread. All foods served are healthy and hygienic in all our camping trips. Spacious two men tents for overnights with dining tents as per group size we also
provide portable chairs and tables, along with toilets tents.

12: TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION:

Mera Peak trek and climb involves only short flight in a small aircraft where transportation includes to ferry from hotel-airport to hotel in Kathmandu. Communication services where you can buy local SIM Card in Kathmandu or using Satellite phone will be useful to carry, the line might not work in some areas on deep valley and gorge, but once on higher ridges and hills will be fine and does connect.
The only problem is for charging once from Lukla no assist for electric power except if you carry your portable solar panel with enough extra batteries to last during the trip.

13. What is Mera Peak’s Death rate?

Challenging Mera peak (6,476 m) is strenuous with lots of steps and many ups and downs. Though climbing higher on Mera peak through the lower realm of the death zone, 5,500 m/ 18,044ft is unpredictable. Indeed there is the very minimum death rate. Yearly, thousands of climbers ascend Mera peak, but deaths on Mera peak are noticed rarely.

14. What Equipments are Required for the Trek?

This list is a guideline to help you pack for your adventure. Also, understand that the items listed below will vary a little according to the season and the trek duration. The weight limit for your luggage is 33 pounds or 15 kg. Remember that your luggage will be carried by your porter, but you are required to take a day-pack (with your valuables or anything important) on your own. We also suggest that you pack what is necessary.

Climbing

  • Climbing harness
  • 5 meters or more of 6mm climber’s accessory cord
  • Figure 8 or Abseil belay device
  • One large mitten sized ascender (large Petzl) and arm length leash
  • Two locking carabiners, one large and one small
  • Four regular carabiners
  • Ice ax with a leash
  • Crampons – must fit your boots perfectly. Steel crampons with anti-balling (anti-bot) plates are the most recommended
  • Adjustable trekking poles
  • Helmet
  • Ski goggles
  • Glacier sunglasses with side shields

Head

  • Bandana or headscarf, also useful for dusty conditions
  • Warm hat that covers your ears (wool or synthetic)
  • Headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs
  • Sunglasses with UV protection
  • Prescription sunglasses (if required)

Upper Body

  • Polypropylene shirts (1 half sleeve and two long sleeves)
  • Light and expedition weight thermal tops
  • Fleece wind-stopper jacket or pullover
  • Waterproof (preferably breathable fabric) shell jacket
  • Down vest and jacket
  • Gore-Tex jacket with hood, waterproof and breathable

Hands

  • One pair of lightweight poly liner gloves.
  • One pair of lightweight wool or fleece gloves
  • One pair of mittens consists of 1 Gore-Tex over mitt matched with a hot polar-fleece mitt liner (seasonal)

Lower Body

  • Non-cotton underwear briefs
  • One pair of Hiking shorts
  • One pair of Hiking trousers
  • One pair of lightweight thermal bottoms (seasonal)
  • One pair of fleece or wool trousers
  • One pair of waterproof shell pants, breathable fabric

Feet

  • Two pairs of thin, lightweight inner socks
  • Two pairs of heavy poly or wool socks
  • One pair of Hiking boots with spare laces (sturdy soles, water-resistant, ankle support, “broken-in”)
  • One pair of trainers or running shoes and sandals
  • Cotton socks (optional)
  • Gaiters (winter only), optional, “low” ankle high version

Sleeping

  • One sleeping bag (good to -10 degrees C or 14 degrees F)
  • Fleece sleeping bag liner (optional)

Rucksack and Travel Bags

  • One medium rucksack (50-70 liters/3000-4500 cubic inches, can be used for an airplane carryon)
  • One large duffel bag
  • A small day-pack/backpack for carrying your valuables should have good shoulder padding
  • Small padlocks for duffle-kit bags
  • Two large waterproof rucksack covers (optional)

Medical

  • Small, personal first-aid kit. (simple and light)
  • Aspirin, first-aid tape, and plasters (Band-Aids)
  • One skin-blister repair kit
  • Anti-diarrhea pills
  • Anti-headache pills
  • Cough and cold medicine
  • Anti-altitude sickness pills: Diamox or Acetazolamide
  • Stomach antibiotic: Ciprofloxacin, etc. Do not bring sleeping pills as they are respiratory depressants.
  • Water purification tablets or the water filter
  • 1 set of earplugs
  • Extra pair of prescription glasses, contact lens supplies

Practical Items

  • One small roll of repair tape, one sewing-repair kit
  • One cigarette lighter, one small box of matches
  • One compass or GPS(optional)
  • One alarm clock/watch
  • One digital camera with extra cards and batteries
  • large Ziplocs
  • Two water bottles (1 liter each)
  • One small folding knife
  • Binoculars (optional)
  • Four large, waterproof, disposable rubbish sacks

Toiletries

  • One medium-sized quick-drying towel
  • Toothbrush/paste (preferably biodegradable)
  • Multipurpose soap (preferably biodegradable)
  • Deodorants
  • Nail clippers
  • Face and body moisturizer
  • Female hygiene products
  • Small mirror

Personal Hygiene

  • Wet wipes (baby wipes)
  • Tissue /toilet roll
  • Anti-bacterial handwash

Extras/Luxuries

  • Reading book
  • Trail map/guide book
  • Journal and pen
  • iPod
  • Travel game i.e., chess, backgammon, scrabble, playing cards (to help you pass the time at tea- houses and camps)
  • One modest swimsuit
  • Binoculars (optional)
  • Voltage converter (from 220 to 110)
  • Plug adapter (2 round pegs to 2 flat pegs)
  • Lightweight   (in case your tea houses provide you with pillows) or use your stuff as a pillow

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